Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene (Predental Track)

Location: Boston
Start Term: Fall

As a dentist, you have the power to restore and promote patients’ oral health. This unique program allows you to begin your education focused on your goal of attending dental school, while preparing you as a dental hygienist. 

In this 37-month program, you'll spend the first 21 months completing your core curriculum and dental school prerequisites on the Boston campus. Then, you will continue in the 16-month professional phase in Boston, where you’ll have the opportunity to work alongside professional experts through clinical experiences in our prestigious on-campus clinic and community facilities.

When you graduate in December, you’ll be eligible to sit for the dental hygiene licensing examinations and may work as a dental hygienist to gain practical experience before starting dental school. With far more clinical expertise than many of your dental school peers, you'll be positioned to flourish in dental school.

Students with 12 or more college credits may transfer in to the first or second year of the dental hygiene (predental track) program. Courses must have been completed at a regionally accredited college or university with a grade of C or better for transfer. Math and science courses taken more than ten years prior to the anticipated date of matriculation to MCPHS will not be accepted.

While there are no specific required courses for entry into the first year of our program, the admission committee will look for success in any math and science courses you have already taken. If you complete any of the courses listed below, you may receive transfer credit and your first year course load may be lighter. However, due to the lock-step nature of MCPHS programs, entering the first year of the program with transfer credits will not change the total length of your program. Courses, other than elective courses, may not be moved forward in your schedule.

Required Courses For Entry Into Year II:

  • General Biology I & II (8 credits) 
  • Anatomy and Physiology I & II with lab (8 credits)
    Chemical Principles I & II with lab (8 credits)
    Calculus I & II (6 credits)
    Expository Writing I & II (6 credits)
  • Interpersonal Communications for Health Professionals (3 credits) (Acceptable substitutions include Introduction to Speech)
  • Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
  • Humanities elective (3 credits) (Acceptable courses include Literature, Creative Writing, Philosophy, Ethics, Religious Studies, Select Fine Arts, Advanced Level Languages)

Additional Courses Required for Entry into Year III:

  • Organic Chemistry I & II with lab (8 credits) 
  • Microbiology with lab (4 credits)
  • Foundations of Physics I & II (8 credits)
  • Statistics (3 credits) (Acceptable substitutions include Basic Statistics, Biostatistics, Psychological Statistics, Economic Statistics)
  • Cultural Anthropology (3 credits)
  • American Culture, Identity, and Public Life (3 credits) (Acceptable substitutions include American History, U.S. History, U.S. Government, Western Civilization)
  • Health Psychology (3 credits)
  • Healthcare Ethics (3 credits)

Curriculum


Year I – Fall

COURSE
TITLE
SEMESTER HOURS

BIO 151

Biology I: Cell And Molecular Biology

3

BIO 150L

Biology I Lab

1

CHE 131

Chemistry Principles (w/ lab)

4

FYS 101

Introduction to the Major

1

LIB 111

Expository Writing I

3

MAT 151

Calculus I

3

TOTAL


15

Year I – Spring

COURSE
TITLE
SEMESTER HOURS

BIO 152

Biology II Biology of Organisms (w/ lab)

4

CHE 132

Chemistry Principles (w/ lab)

4

LIB 112

Expository Writing II

3

MAT 152

Calculus II

3

LIB 120

Intro To Psychology

3

TOTAL


17

Year I – Summer Session

COURSE

TITLE
SEMESTER HOURS

BIO 110

Anatomy & Physiology I (w/ lab)

4

BIO 210

Anatomy & Physiology II (w/ lab)

4

 

HUM distribution elective

3

LIB 220

Introduction to Interpersonal Communication for Health Professionals

3

TOTAL


14

Year II – Fall

COURSE
TITLE
SEMESTER HOURS

CHE 231

Organic Chemistry (w/ lab)

4

LIB 133

American Culture, Identity, and Public Life 

3

BEH 250

Health Psychology (counts for DHY Program Elective & BEH elective)

3

PHY 280

Foundations of Physics I

3

PHY 280L

Foundations of Physics Lab I 

1

TOTAL


14

Year II – Spring

COURSE

TITLE
SEMESTER HOURS

CHE 232

Organic Chemistry II 

3

CHE 234L

Organic Chemistry II Lab

1

SSC 230

Cultural Anthropology

3

LIB 510

Healthcare Ethics

3

PHY 284 & 284L

Foundations of Physics II (w/ lab)

4

TOTAL


14

Year II – Summer Session

COURSE
TITLE
SEMESTER HOURS

BIO 255

Medical Microbiology (w/ lab)

4

MAT 261

Statistics

3

PSB 311

Biochemistry

3

DHY 223

Nutrition

3

TOTAL


12

Year III – Fall – Professional Phase

COURSE
TITLE
SEMESTER HOURS

DHY 202

Dental Anatomy and Histology

2

DHY 204

Head and Neck Anatomy

2

DHY 209

Dental Hygiene Process of Care I

4

DHY 209L

Dental Hygiene Preclinic Laboratory

2

DHY 230

Dental Radiology (w/ lab)

3

DHY 321

Dental Materials (w/ lab)

3

TOTAL


16

Year III – Spring

COURSE
TITLE
SEMESTER HOURS

DHY 211

Dental Hygiene Process of Care II

3

DHY 223

Clinic I

3

DHY 233

Periodontology

3

DHY 330

Pathology

3

DHY 343

Pain Management

2

DHY 341

Pain Management Lab

1

TOTAL


15

Year III – Summer

COURSE
TITLE
SEMESTER HOURS

DHY 310

Dental Hygiene Process of Care III

3

DHY 350

Community Oral Health

3

DHY 530

Oral Health Research

3

DHY 323

Clinical Dental Hygiene II

4

TOTAL


13

Year IV – Fall

COURSE
TITLE
SEMESTER HOURS

DHY 311

Dental Hygiene Process of Care IV

2

DHY 324

Clinical Dental Hygiene III

4

DHY 342

Pharmacology

3

DHY 460

Capstone Leadership in Dental Hygiene

3

DHY 345

Practice & Career Management

2

TOTAL


14

Total credits to complete degree program: 144 s.h.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the demand for dentists is expected to grow at a much faster rate than many other occupations, with a potential 18% increase in jobs needed by 2024. This growth is partly driven by demand for preventive dental services spurred by ongoing research linking oral health to general health as well as the aging baby boomer population, who are retaining more of their original teeth than previous generations.

 The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics also reports that the median annual wage for dentists was $158,310 in May 2015, with the highest 10 percent earning more than $187,200.

The U.S. News & World Report listed Orthodontist as the #1 and Dentist as the #2 profession in its “100 Best Jobs” list in 2016.

For students who do not continue their education at dental school, dental hygiene is a promising field. Dental Hygienists rank #2 in the U.S. News’ list of the 100 Best Health Care Support Jobs of 2016 and #32 in U.S. News’ list of the 100 Best Jobs of 2016.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the median annual wage for dental hygienists was $72,330 in May 2015. Associate’s degrees are the most common among practicing dental hygienists, while our bachelor’s degree offers the potential for even higher earnings. The demand for dental hygienists is expected to grow at a much faster rate than many other occupations, with a potential 19% increase in jobs needed through 2024.